Kevin

 See Kevin's full set at  http://patreon.com/hellapositive !

See Kevin's full set at http://patreon.com/hellapositive!

My name is Kevin, and I am a straight person who responds to he/him but has never felt much loyalty to or inclusion by a tribe of maleness, or even to normal modes of gender, though not because of principle or ideals. I'm a choreographer, performer, lindy hopper, contemporary dancer. 

I'm sure I'm not the first to say that the idea of feeling attractive or sexy, either in general or to someone specifically, was an entirely foreign concept growing up. I think what friends I had and I assumed IF someone liked you, it would be despite your physical body and because of some abundance of virtue of some kind, a concept I now understand as a root in "nice guy" or "friend-zone" mentalities. 

As I grew up and eventually became someone who is attractive to at least a few people, most of the things that partners remarked being attracted to on myself had nothing to do with fulfilling a "male" ideal at all, so even today I find it somewhat odd to consider myself male. 

I feel my sexiest, what I feel as sexy, when I'm dancing and grooving, and investigating the sensations of my body; or really, when I feel joyful. Training with Batsheva and Gaga have both opened doors to explore the sensations of pleasure that come from fulfilling our desire to move. 

I also feel sexiest when I give to my partners in some physical kind of way, during sexy times or otherwise. Experiencing your effects on them and their effects on you is pure, but in a good way.

I think my favorite parts of my body are currently my shoulder blades, but I'm told my butt is the fan favorite. Lots of squats, plies, and jumps! 

I believe, firmly, that sex and sexiness are integral parts of who we are, and while some people might seem naturally or obviously sexy, many (including myself) have lots of trouble believing and accepting our bodies as the vehicles for that sexiness. As a dancer in NYC, the amount of pressure and neuroses I have about my body are likely much greater than are obvious to those I teach or perform for/with. 

We are only given one body, the body we take with us until we move on, and accepting that is probably hard for any of us, even if we might seem to have won some genetic lottery that indicates otherwise. When it comes down to it, wanting to feel sexy, to feel empowered, to feel attractive comes down to a desire to be loved as we are. Doing this photo shoot with Braden was one of the hardest things I've done emotionally because it was one of the most vulnerable. We agreed to keep all photoshop and touch ups to a minimum as an exercise in accepting the body as it is, at that moment. 

Hopefully the honesty and vulnerability come through! Enjoy!